Untitled

buzzfeed:

RIP Harold.

remembrance

prepaidafrica:

By CARLOS LOPES and KAMAL DERVIS

EVERYONE stands to gain if Africa can sustain and accelerate its progress in tackling poverty and finding jobs for its growing young population. The Africa Growth and Opportunity Act (Agoa) rarely makes headlines in the United States. But the frequency with which it was raised during President Barack Obama’s recent trip to Africa underlines how important it is.

De-legislation is seen on the continent both as a driver of progress and as a symbol of the US’s relations with it. The need to extend Agoa, due to expire in 2015, was a clear priority for the countries Obama visited. It is easy to see why so much importance is attached to Agoa in Africa. The Act, which began operating in 2001, has succeeded in its goal of helping reduce poverty through increased trade and investment with the US. Incomes have been raised and hundreds of thousands of jobs have been created, especially for women.

And while the biggest growth in trade has been in oil, Agoa has also helped strengthen and diversify economies. Lesotho and Kenya are among the nations which have seen the opportunities provided through Agoa and triggered crucial investment in new sectors and industries. But while Agoa, which enables African countries that show progress towards a market-based economy to export a wide range of products to the US free of quotas or duty, is widely supported across the continent, it remains more controversial in the United States.

Critics have warned that extending the Act beyond 2015 would damage America’s own interests and employment. The Act’s opponents argue that Africa’s impressive growth in the 21st Century means the continent no longer needs special treatment.

Hard evidence, however, shows that while African countries have certainly gained, as intended, the most from Agoa, the benefits have not by any means been all one-way.

bijan:

It’s no secret that the follow/follower model in Twitter was a meaningful breakthrough in social experiences.

It’s elegant, simple and works.

And as a result we see this model in some of the most popular products around today. Each adding their own flavor of the follower model.

It’s only…

bijan:

It’s no secret that the follow/follower model in Twitter was a meaningful breakthrough in social experiences.

It’s elegant, simple and works.

And as a result we see this model in some of the most popular products around today. Each adding their own flavor of the follower model.

It’s only…

好!

futuristgerd:

Parallels Summit 2012 Keynote - Guy Kawasaki by ParallelsCloudTV

What we really want are machines that can go a step further, endowed not only with the soundest codes of ethics that our best contemporary philosophers can devise, but also with the possibility of machines making their own moral progress, bringing them past our own limited early-twenty-first century idea of morality.
Gary Marcus on Google’s driver-less car, and building machines with the ability to make ethical decisions: http://nyr.kr/R8J1ua (via newyorker)
noonesnemesis:

Ms Elaine Silbert
photo by Joseph Jasgur
1940’s

too beautiful to say

noonesnemesis:

Ms Elaine Silbert

photo by Joseph Jasgur

1940’s

too beautiful to say